History

History Staff

Mrs D Cullen

Curriculum Leader of Humanities

Mrs C Howard

History, General Studies

Mr A Lund

History, Geography

Key Stage 3 - Yrs 7 - 9

History KS3 Handbook

 Year 7 - Autumn Term:

Topic 1 - What is History? September to October Half-Term:

  • Introduction to History: students learn various skills, such as detailed description, explanation, using sources to get information from, inference and analysis.
  • Students do this through a variety of topics including a school trail and detective work to find out what happened to a missing person.

Topic 2 - Britain: Pre-History to Written History, including The Romans: October Half-Term to February Half-Term:

  • Students will find out what life was like before the Romans arrived in Britain, and the changes they brought. They will make a decision on whether these changes were for the better for ancient Britons, or not.
  • Students will take part in a Roman Curriculum Day, spending time off timetable learning about Roman food, place names, Roman soldiers, and Roman art.
  • We will then look at various aspects of life in the Roman Empire: soldiers living at Hadrian’s Wall, their houses, the rich and poor, entertainment, gladiators, the destruction of Pompeii by Mount Vesuvius, ending with why the Roman Empire collapsed, and its legacy.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

 

Year 8 - Autumn Term:

Topic 1 - The Development of Britain: 1509-1745:

  • This topic continues from their work in Year 7 (Medieval England).
  • We will study the problems Henry VIII had with the Church and how the Reformation affected England during the Tudors.
  • We also look at the reign of Elizabeth I, including how she showed her power and the attack by the Spanish Armada.
  • This topic will continue into the Spring term.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

 Year 9 - Autumn Term:

Topic 1 - Ideas, Political Power, Industry and Empire, Britain 1745-1901-Conclusion:

  • This continues from before Summer of Year 8 and will focus on initially on the improvements made in Britain to the voting system.
  • Students will then study Britain’s Empire, with the focus on the slave trade followed by Britain’s role in India and whether their Empire was a good or bad thing for Britain and its colonies.

Topic 2 - Britain, Europe and the Wider World 1901-date:

  • This topic covers both World Wars in the 20th Century.
  • We study the causes of World War I, then focus on the life of the soldiers in the trenches, asking the question: how far did British tactics help them win WW1.
  • This topic will continue into the Spring Term.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

Year 7

Spring Term:

Topic 1 - Britain: Pre-History to Written History, including The Romans: October Half-Term to February Half-Term:

  • This carries on from before Christmas.
  • We will look at various aspects of life in the Roman Empire: their government, slaves, religion, childhood, entertainment, gladiators, the destruction of Pompeii by Mount Vesuvius, ending with why the Roman Empire collapsed, and its legacy.

Topic 2 - The Development of Church, State and Society in Medieval England 1066-1509: February Half-Term to end of Summer Term:

  • This topic looks at how life changed in England after the Normans successfully invaded in 1066.
  • We study various aspects of life in Medieval England, its relationship with Scotland, Wales, Ireland and France, life for peasants in villages and towns, religion, castles, the Black Death and the Peasants’ Revolt.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

Year 8

Spring Term:

Topic 1 - The Development of Britain: 1509-1745:

  • This topic continues from the autumn term.
  • We continue to look at the reign of Elizabeth I, including how she showed her power and the attack by the Spanish Armada.
  • We then study the Causes of the Civil War in 1642, life during that Civil War and what happened afterwards.
  • Finally, we assess how England, Scotland and Wales united and how and why government changed during this period.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

 Year 9

Spring Term :

Topic 2 - Britain, Europe and the Wider World 1901-present:

  • This topic continues from before Christmas.
  • This topic covers both World Wars in the 20th Century.
  • For World War I, students will study the causes of this war, making a judgement on the most important one. They will then analyse sources to discover what life was like for soldiers in the Trenches in the Western Front.
  • We then study Europe between the wars, the peace made after World War I, the rise of dictators in Russia, Italy and Germany, and life for Germans under Hitler.
  • For World War 2 we analyse why it happened, what life was like for civilians in Britain during World War 2, then students will study key events such as the Battle of Britain, the D-Day Landings and the Holocaust.
  • Finally, we look at what happened after World War 2, the Cold War and Vietnam.
  • This topic will continue into the Summer Term.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

 Year 7

Summer Term:

Topic 1 - Medieval England:

  • Continuing work started before the Easter holidays.
  • This topic looks at how life changed in England after the Normans successfully invaded in 1066.
  • We examine various aspects of life in Medieval England, its relationship with Scotland, Wales, Ireland and France, life for peasants in villages and towns, religion, castles, the Black Death and the Peasants’ Revolt.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

 Year 8

Summer Term:

Topic 1 - Industrial Revolution:

  • Students will be examining at the changes brought to Britain by industry and factories in the 1700s and 1800s. This topic continues their journey through British History.
  •  Students will work out the benefits and problems caused by the changes to farming, the start of factories, and the changes in transport with the development of the railways.
  • Students will also discover how and why people protested during this period, and the changes brought to elections that occurred.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.
Year 9

Summer Term:

Topic 1 - Twentieth Century Europe Conclusion:

  • This topic continues from before Easter
  • This topic covers both World Wars in the 20th Century.
  • For World War 2 we analyse why it happened, what life was like for civilians in Britain during World War 2, then students will study key events such as the Battle of Britain, the D-Day Landings and the Holocaust.
  • Finally, we look at what happened after World War 2, the Cold War and Vietnam.

Topic 2 - Study of a Significant Society: USA in the 20th Century:

  • This topic covers the Civil Rights Movement in the USA from the ending of slavery in the 1860s to modern times. Students will look at the actions of the campaigners, such as Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, and key events such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Civil Rights laws of 1964.

Recommended Resources:

  • Students will be given a textbook each; they will also use other resources such as Power-Point presentations, worksheets, picture sources, letters, video-clips, to help with their learning.
  • Students could watch any relevant TV historical programmes (BBC2, BBC4, Yesterday, are all good channels).
  • www.schoolshistory.co.uk is a very good web-site with lots of web links to others sites.
  • The ‘Horrible History’ TV and book series are good, but you need to be careful as some of what they say happened, did happen, but only rarely, and weren’t the norm. But the TV programme on CBBC is really good to get students motivated and interested in History.

Homework:

  • This will be set roughly once a week, and will be written in their Planners, along with the date it is due. It will also be on the school’s online Homework site. Homework will often be extended projects/independent learning, spread over 2-3 weeks.

Equipment Required:

  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Rubber
  • Sharpener
  • Text-books-if not left in the classroom
  • Exercise books-if not left in the classroom
  • Planner

Assessment:

  • Students are assessed right from the start with regular mini assessments which are based on GCSE-style questions, with scaffolding and teacher-input to help. Students will be prepared for each one and have help throughout. They will not be memory tests. Most students won’t even feel they’re being assessed! These will be marked using the new 9-1 system that the school is using to replace the old levels.
  • Students will also have formal assessments following the calendar exam period.

How You Can Help:

  • Check that homework has been completed.
  • Help students prepare for assessments and their exam.
  • Ensure students have the correct equipment.
  • If you can, find time to ask them what they have learnt, and to even teach you!
  • Watch TV programmes with them, if possible, and discuss what you have learnt together.
  • Try to ensure 100% attendance; if a student misses a lesson that could be a whole week’s worth of History. Therefore students must borrow someone’s book to catch up.

 

 

Key Stage 4 - GCSE

 

 

Crime and Punishment in Britain, c1000-present-Thematic Study

Whitechapel c1870-c1900: crime, policing and the inner city-Historical Environment

In this paper you will learn about how crime and punishment has changed across time, from the later Saxons, through to Modern Times, looking at all periods you’ve studied at Key Stage 3 (Years 7, 8 and 9!). You will find out what crimes have changed, what have stayed the same, and how crime has been punished. You will also find out about how crime prevention has also changed during this course. There is a lot of relevance with modern life as we got right up to the present day and how you view crime, policing, and punishments. The focus is on the Jack the Ripper murders in Whitechapel

Paper 1 is 1hr 15mins long. You will answer source questions on Jack the Ripper and Whitechapel. These range from 4-8 marks. Questions on Crime and punishment include ‘why’ or ‘how far’ questions and range from 4-16 marks. There are also 4 marks available for SPAG in the last question.

The American West c1835-c1895-Period Study

Anglo-Saxon and Norman England c1060-88-British Depth Study

In this paper you will learn about the inhabitants and settlers of the American West including the Plains Indians, their beliefs and way of life. You will also find out about the White Settlers, the trappers, miners, Mormons, the Oregon Trail, cattlemen, cowboys and ranches, why people settled, and what their settlements were like - homesteaders, farming, railroads, etc. Finally, you will look at the conflict that arose between the Native Americans and the white settlers.

The second section is all about how and why the Normans invaded England in 1066, the Battle of Hastings, and how the Normans managed to keep control of England after 1066. It looks at what changed and what stayed the same due to the Norman Conquest.

 Paper 2 is 1hr 45mins long. You will answer questions assessing the importance or consequence of an event in the history of the American West and a narrative account of a particular event from this period. These range from 8-16 marks. Section 2 questions are similar to the questions on Crime and Punishment and range from 4-16 marks. SPAG is not assessed in this paper.

Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-1939– Modern Depth Study

This is a source-based paper. You will look at the legacy of World War I and the problems and successes of the Weimar Republic set up after the Kaiser’s abdication. You will also look at the reasons why Hitler was elected and how he created the dictatorship from 1933. Nazis policies towards various groups including the persecution of minority groups as well as the Jews will be studied as well as how Hitler and the Nazis controlled Germany and who opposed him.

Paper 3 is 1hr 20mins long. You will answer questions about usefulness of interpretations, inference of a source, differences between interpretations, and a ‘why’ question. These range from 4-16 marks. There are also 4 marks available for SPAG in the last question.

All the papers will be examined in the May/June of Year 11. You will be with either Mrs. Howard or Mrs. Cullen for Year 10 and swap teachers in Year 11.

For any more information, see either Mrs. Cullen in Room 7 or  Mrs. Howard in Room 8.

 


 

Key Stage 5 - 'A' Level

Course Outline:

A Level History aims to build on the skills developed at Key Stage 3 and GCSE.  It encourages the ability to organise data, understand different points of view, form opinions, present arguments, and undertake personal research; all valuable skills, both in employment and higher education.

The course enables students to study in breadth and in depth aspects of British, European and American History.

Exam Board: OCR History A.  Location: Appleby Grammar School.

Entry Requirements:

We expect our students to have obtained at least a Grade B at GCSE and be willing to work hard and put in a lot of private study to obtain the best results.

AS Course:

Students wishing to either do a stand-alone AS or continue to A2 in History will all complete the same 2 courses in Year 12. The 2 subjects have been chosen after discussion with students currently sitting A Level History and enable students to access a broad scope of History.

Students build on work done at GCSE by studying England under the last Saxon king and the impact the Norman Conquest had on England, looking at the problems faced in England after the death of King Canute in 1035, and consolidation of the Norman Conquest from 1066 through to the death of William the Conqueror’s successor, William Rufus in 1107.

For Paper 2, students will build on Year 9 knowledge of dictators, in their study of Russia from 1894-1941. Students will study the rule of the last Tsar of Russia and explain and analyse the 1917 Revolutions. They will also investigate the Civil War and rule of Lenin that followed and understand the rule of Stalin. requires students to compare interpretations of differing historians on either Tsar Nicholas, or the Civil War and Lenin.

A2 Course:

Students will revisit the 2 units studied in Year 12 as part of their revision; however the questions they will have at the end of Year 13 will have a more mature wording and be worth slightly different marks.

Paper 3 will be studied in Year 13 and is on Civil Rights in the USA 1865-1992. There are 2 areas to this paper: themes over the 100 years, including African Americans, Women, Native American Indians. The paper also allows students to study areas in depth, such as the New Deal and civil rights, and Malcolm X and Black Power.

Finally, Paper 4 is worth 40 marks, and is an investigation chosen by the student. It is a topic-based essay that could be an investigation based on something that the students has found interesting in their previous studies and want to investigate in more depth. Or it could be something they’ve not studied in school, but are fascinated about. It is around 3000-4000 words and must include a range of sources and interpretations to help students develop an understanding of how historians work. Students do not get examined on this topic; it is marked  by Appleby staff and moderated by the exam board.

Progression Opportunities:

History encourages the ability to organise data, understand different points of view, form opinions, present arguments and undertake personal research; all valuable skills both in employment and higher education. You do not need to go for a course or a job that is history-related; it’s the skills you acquire from studying history that impresses employers. But typical jobs include: lawyers, detectives, archives, journalism, insurance, banking, accountancy, research assistants for government.